1. time-engineer:

    sci-universe:

    Reminder that there are great space agencies out there.

    NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration
    ESA - European Space Agency
    CNSA - China National Space Administration
    JAXA - Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
    CSA - Canadian Space Agency
    ROSCOSMOS - Russian Federal Space Agency

    And about 1/2 of them look like the Starfleet symbol

    (Source: knowledgethroughscience, via spaceandstuffidk)

     

  2. Expedition 33 Flight Engineer Aki Hoshide

    ISS033-E-017976 (1 Nov. 2012) —- Expedition 33 Flight Engineer Akihiko Hoshide participates in a 6-hour, 38-minute spacewalk outside the International Space Station on Nov. 1, 2012. During the spacewalk, Expedition 33 Commander Sunita Williams, NASA astronaut, and Hoshide, who represents the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), ventured outside the orbital outpost to perform work and to support ground-based troubleshooting of an ammonia leak.

     

  3. Expedition 33 Lands

    201211190002hq (19 Nov. 2012) —- The Soyuz TMA-05M spacecraft is seen shortly after it landed with Expedition 33 Commander Sunita Williams of NASA and Flight Engineers Akihiko Hoshide of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and Yuri Malenchenko of Roscosmos (Russian Federal Space Agency) in a remote area near the town of Arkalyk, Kazakhstan on Nov. 19, 2012 (Kazakhstan time). Williams, Hoshide and Malenchenko returned from four months onboard the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

     

  4. Expedition 33 Soyuz Departs

    ISS034-E-005003 (18 Nov. 2012) —- The Soyuz TMA-05M spacecraft departs from the International Space Station and heads toward a landing in a remote area outside the town of Arkalyk, Kazakhstan on Nov. 19, 2012 (Kazakhstan time). NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Expedition 33 commander; Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko, Soyuz commander and flight engineer; and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, flight engineer, are returning from four months onboard the space station where they served as members of the Expedition 32 and 33 crews.

     

  5. itsfullofstars:

    NASA TV to Cover Departure of Japanese Cargo Ship From Space Station Sept. 12

    NASA Television will provide live coverage of the third Japanese “Kounotori” H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) cargo ship’s departure from the International Space Station in two broadcasts Wednesday, Sept. 12. The first, covering unberthing, will begin at 6:30 a.m. EDT, and the second, covering release, will begin at 11:30 a.m. 

    HTV-3, launched by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) July 21, arrived to the orbiting laboratory July 27 with several tons of supplies and experiments. Departure, originally planned for Sept. 6, was delayed to accommodate a second spacewalk by Expedition 32 Flight Engineers Sunita Williams of NASA and Akihiko Hoshide of JAXA on Wednesday. 

    Hoshide and fellow Expedition 32 Flight Engineer Joe Acaba of NASA will be at the controls of the station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm to unbolt and disengage the cargo craft from the station’s Harmony module. A few hours later the astronauts will release the cargo craft, which will be moved a safe distance away from the complex. JAXA flight controllers later will fire the spacecraft’s engine, initiating its destructive entry back through Earth’s atmosphere. 

    For NASA TV streaming video, downlink and scheduling information, visit: 

    http://www.nasa.gov/ntv

     

  6. Earth and Moon as Seen from Mars

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera would make a great backyard telescope for viewing Mars, and we can also use it at Mars to view other planets. This is an image of Earth and the moon, acquired on October 3, 2007, by the HiRISE camera on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

    At the time the image was taken, Earth was 142 million kilometers (88 million miles) from Mars, giving the HiRISE image a scale of 142 kilometers (88 miles) per pixel, an Earth diameter of about 90 pixels and a moon diameter of 24 pixels. The phase angle is 98 degrees, which means that less than half of the disk of the Earth and the disk of the moon have direct illumination. We could image Earth and moon at full disk illumination only when they are on the opposite side of the sun from Mars, but then the range would be much greater and the image would show less detail.

    On the day this image was taken, the Japanese Kayuga (Selene) spacecraft was en route from the Earth to the moon, and has since returned spectacular images and movies (see http://www.jaxa.jp/projects/sat/selene/index_e.html).

    On the Earth image we can make out the west coast outline of South America at lower right, although the clouds are the dominant features. These clouds are so bright, compared with the moon, that they are saturated in the HiRISE images. In fact the red-filter image was almost completely saturated, the Blue-Green image had significant saturation, and the brightest clouds were saturated in the infrared image. This color image required a fair amount of processing to make a nice-looking release. The moon image is unsaturated but brightened relative to Earth for this composite. The lunar images are useful for calibration of the camera.

    NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project and built the spacecraft. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment is operated by the University of Arizona, Tucson, and the instrument was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corp., Boulder, Colo.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona 

     

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  8. Does anyone know of…

    fuckyeahspaceexploration:

    … any Russian/Chinese/Japenese/European space exploration photo archives? NASA has plenty on flickr and on affiliate websites, but I haven’t found any high quality sources for other agencies. This results in my blog being quite US-centric when really it should have a worldwide emphasis.

    If you know of any good sources, please message me and I will be eternally grateful.

    Thanks

    ESA has a nice gallery. And here’s JAXA’s.

     

  9. spacettf:

    Earth from Space: Madagascar jellyfish by europeanspaceagency on Flickr.

    Via Flickr:
    The Betsiboka estuary in northwest Madagascar is pictured in this image. Here, the country’s largest river flows into Bombetoka Bay, which then opens into the Mozambique Channel. The red colouring of the sandbars and islands between the ‘jellyfish tentacles’ comes from sediments washed from hills and into the streams and rivers during heavy rain. The seaport city of Mahajanga can be seen in the upper-left corner of the image.
    Japan’s ALOS satellite captured this image on 17 September 2010 with its AVNIR-2 Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer. ALOS was supported as a Third Party Mission, which means that ESA used its multi-mission ground systems to acquire, process, distribute and archive data from the satellite to its user community. In April 2011 the satellite abruptly lost power while mapping Japan’s tsunami-hit coastline.

    Credits: JAXA, ESA

     

  10. fuckyesnasa:

    The Soyuz TMA-02M spacecraft launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan early Wednesday, June 8, 2011 carrying Expedition 28 Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov of Russia, NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum and JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) Flight Engineer Satoshi Furukawa to the International Space Station.

    Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

    (Source: hellyesnasa, via fuckyeahspacedotcom)

     

  11. Expedition 28 Launch (201106080003HQ)

    The Soyuz TMA-02M spacecraft launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan early Wednesday, June 8, 2011 carrying Expedition 28 Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov of Russia, NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum and JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) Flight Engineer Satoshi Furukawa to the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

     

  12. Expedition 28 Launch (201106080008HQ) (explored)

    The Soyuz TMA-02M spacecraft launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan early Wednesday, June 8, 2011 carrying Expedition 28 Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov of Russia, NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum and JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) Flight Engineer Satoshi Furukawa to the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

     

  13. The Soyuz TMA-02M spacecraft launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan early Wednesday, June 8, 2011 carrying Expedition 28 Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov of Russia, NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum and JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) Flight Engineer Satoshi Furukawa to the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

     

  14. placeofpluto:

    BepiColombo’s Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO) and its sunshield in the Large Space Simulator at ESTEC, The Netherlands. The octagonal spacecraft is Japan’s contribution to BepiColombo and will explore Mercury’s magnetic field and plasma environment. The sunshield keeps the spacecraft cool during the cruise to the inner planet.


    10 facts about BepiColombo and some more 

    Credits: ESA/JAXA