1. ourpresidents:

    Apollo 17 - The Last Apollo Moon Mission

    Vice-President Agnew attends the Apollo 17 lift-off at the Kennedy Space Flight Center. December 7, 1972. The Richard Nixon Presidential Library & Museum, Yorba Linda, CA.

    Apollo 17 was the last mission of the Apollo program.  It returned to Earth on December 19, 1972.

    More - White House photos of the Apollo 17 Astronauts from the Nixon Library

    (via pbsthisdayinhistory)

     

  2. Title:
    Apollo 17 command module splashdown in South Pacific Ocean

    Description:
    The Apollo 17 command module, with astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E. Evans and Harrison H. Schmitt aboard, nears splashdown in the South Pacific Ocean to conclude the final lunar landing mission in the Apollo program. This overhead view was taken from a recovery aircraft seconds before the spacecraft hit the water. The splashdown occurred at 304:31:59 ground elapsed time, 1:24:59 p.m. December 19, 1972 about 350 nautical miles southeast of the Samoan Islands.

     

  3. Title:
    Astronaut Ronald Evans photographed during transearth coast EVA

    Description:
    Astronaut Ronald E. Evans is photographed performing extravehicular activity (EVA) during the Apollo 17 spacecraft’s transearth coast. During his EVA Command Module pilot Evans retrieved film cassettes from the Lunar Sounder, Mapping Camera, and Panoramic Camera. The total time for the transearth EVA was one hour seven minutes 19 seconds, starting at ground elapsed time of 257:25 (2:28 p.m.) and ending at ground elapsed time of 258:42 (3:35 p.m.) on Sunday, December 17, 1972.

     

  4. Title:
    Cresent Earth rises above lunar horizon
    Description:
    The cresent Earth rises above the lunar horizon in this photograph taken from the Apollo 17 spacecraft in lunar orbit during NASA’s final lunar landing mission in the Apollo program.
     

  5. Title:
    Apollo 17 Command/Service modules photographed from lunar module in orbit

    Description:
    A view of the Apollo 17 command and service modules photographed from the lunar module (LM) Challenger during rendezvous and docking maneuvers in lunar orbit. The LM ascent stage, with astronauts Eugene A. Cernan and Harrison H. Schmitt aboard, had just returned from the Taurus-Littrow landing site on the lunar surface.

     

  6. Title:
    Astronaut Eugene Cernan salutes deployed U.S. flag on lunar surface

    Description:
    Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 17 commander, salutes the deployed U.S. flag on the lunar surface during extravehicular activity (EVA) of NASA’s final lunar landing mission in the Apollo series. The lunar module is at the left background and the lunar roving vehicle, also in background, is partially obscured. The photo was made by Astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot.

     

  7. Title:
    Astronaut Eugene Cernan walks toward LRV during EVA

    Description:
    Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 17 mission commander, walks toward the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) during extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site of the final Apollo lunar landing mission. The photograph was taken by astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot.

     

  8. Apollo 17 at Shorty Crater 
    Image Credit: Apollo 17 Crew, NASA

    Explanation: In December of 1972, Apollo 17 astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt spent about 75 hours on the Moon in the Taurus-Littrow valley, while colleague Ronald Evans orbited overhead. This sharp image was taken by Cernan as he and Schmitt roamed the valley floor. The image shows Schmitt on the left with the lunar rover at the edge of Shorty Crater, near the spot where geologist Schmitt discovered orange lunar soil. The Apollo 17 crew returned with 110 kilograms of rock and soil samples, more than was returned from any of the other lunar landing sites. Now forty years later, Cernan and Schmitt are still the last to walk on the Moon.

     

  9. AS17-137-20979 (12 Dec. 1972) —- A close-up view of the lunar roving vehicle (LRV) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site photographed during Apollo 17 lunar surface extravehicular activity. Note the makeshift repair arrangement on the right rear fender of the LRV. During EVA-1 a hammer got underneath the fender and a part of it was knocked off. Astronauts Eugene A. Cernan and Harrison H. Schmitt were reporting a problem with lunar dust because of the damage fender. Following a suggestion from astronaut John W. Young in the Mission Control Center at Houston the crewmen repaired the fender early in EVA-2 using lunar maps and clamps from the optical alignment telescope lamp. Schmitt is seated in the rover. Cernan took this picture.

    (Source: ahttp)

     

  10. Title:
    Launch of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission

    Description:
    The 363-feet tall Apollo 17 (Spacecraft 114/Lunar Module 12/Saturn 512) space vehicle is launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 12:33 a.m., December 7, 1972. Apollo 17, the final lunar landing mission, was the first nighttime liftoff of the Saturn V launch vehicle. Flame from the five F-1 engines of the Apollo/Saturn first (S-1C) stage illuminates the nighttime scene.

     

  11. The Last Moon Shot 
    Credit: Apollo ProgramNASA (image scanned by J.L. Pickering)

    Explanation: In 1865 Jules Verne predicted the invention of a space capsule that could carry people. His science fiction story "From the Earth to the Moon" outlined his vision of a cannon in Florida so powerful that it could shoot a Projectile-Vehicle carrying three adventurers to the Moon. Over 100 years later NASA, guided by Wernher Von Braun's vision, produced the Saturn V rocket. From a spaceport in Florida, this rocket turned Verne’s fiction into fact, launching 9 Apollo Lunar missions and allowing 12 astronauts to walk on the Moon. As spotlights play on the rocket and launch pad at dusk, the last moon shot, Apollo 17, is pictured here awaiting its December 1972 night launch.

     

  12. Apollo 17 Launch

    The huge, 363-feet tall Apollo 17 (Spacecraft 114/Lunar Module 12/Saturn 512) space vehicle is launched from Pad A., Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, at 12:33 a.m. (EST), Dec. 7, 1972.

    Apollo 17, the final lunar landing mission in NASA’s Apollo program, was the first nighttime liftoff of the Saturn V launch vehicle. Aboard the Apollo 17 spacecraft were astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, commander; astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot; and scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot. Flame from the five F-1 engines of the Apollo/Saturn first (S-1C) stage illuminates the nighttime scene. A two-hour and 40-minute hold delayed the Apollo 17 launching.

    Photo credit: NASA

     

  13. smithsonian:

    Launched Dec. 7, 1972, Apollo 17 was the last space mission to land astronauts on the moon. 

     

  14. discoverynews:

    Apollo Veteran: Skip Asteroid, Go to the Moon: It’s 40 years to the day that the final mission to the moon launched. Discovery News speaks with Apollo 17 astronaut and geologist Harrison “Jack” Schmitt about where he thinks the Earth’s only satellite came from and why he thinks a NASA manned asteroid mission is a mistake.

    “I think an asteroid is a diversion, if the ultimate goal is to get to Mars, you have a satellite only three days away that has a great deal of science as well as resources. The science of the moon has just been scratched. We’ve hardly explored the moon.” — Schmitt

    Read more

     

  15. n-a-s-a:

    Apollo 17 at Shorty Crater

    Image Credit: Apollo 17 Crew, NASA